Remote Sensing in Zimbabwe

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Remote Sensing in Zimbabwe

Introduction

Zimbabwe is a country in Southern Africa, bordering South Africa, Botswana and Mozambique. The country has a population of over 16 million people and its capital city is Harare. Zimbabwe has abundant natural resources such as minerals, gold and platinum which are used in manufacturing industries across the world.

Remote Sensing

Remote sensing is the science and art of obtaining information about an object, area or phenomena through the analysis of data acquired by a device that is not in contact with the object, area or phenomena under investigation.

Remote sensing devices measure radiation that reaches or emanates from the Earth’s surface (emitted radiation) or from above (reflected radiation). The collected data are then analyzed to identify various physical properties of the Earth’s surface and atmosphere.

Definition of remote sensing by United Nations Economic Commission for Africa : remote sensing is the science and art of obtaining information about an object, area or phenomena through the analysis of data acquired by a device that is not in contact with the object, area or phenomena under investigation.

  • Remote sensing is the science and art of obtaining information about an object, area or phenomena through the analysis of data acquired by a device that is not in contact with the object, area or phenomena under investigation.
  • The device used to acquire data may be an orbiting satellite (remote sensing from space), aircraft, radar or airborne platform such as a balloon or aircraft.

In the case of Zimbabwe, the use of remote sensing devices to acquire spatial data requires the use of cameras on either aircrafts or satellites.

Remote sensing is the science and art of obtaining information about an object, area or phenomena through the analysis of data acquired by a device that is not in contact with the object, area or phenomena under investigation.

Remote sensing devices can be used to acquire spatial data without contacting the observed subject because they are in contact with it on a remote basis. In this case, remote sensing refers to acquiring spatial data using sensors mounted on aircrafts or satellites.

Applications

Remote sensing data can be used to identify regions with poor agricultural productivity; which may be due to erosion or unsuitability for crop growth. This information is useful when planning the distribution of land resources. In the case of mineral exploration, remote sensing data can help identify sites that show anomalies that could indicate a potential deposit of minerals.

Remote sensing data are also used in environmental monitoring for purposes such as detecting deforestation, identifying areas at risk from landslides or floods and even forecasting harmful climate change effects such as sea level rise.

The applications of remote sensing range from agriculture, mineral exploration, environment monitoring etc; as such it can be used as a complement in different fields.

Remote sensing is the collection of information about an object or phenomenon without making physical contact with the object and thus in a non-invasive manner. The applications of remote sensing range from agriculture, mineral exploration, environment monitoring etc; as such it can be used as a complement in different fields. For instance if one wants to know where there are high concentrations of minerals in a given area then this can be done by mapping out the surface features with satellite imagery which indicates areas where there might be high concentrations of minerals.

In addition to this it has been used extensively for land cover classification (classifying different types of terrain) and mapping which involves identifying location based on images taken from space using satellites or aircrafts. It has also been used for disaster management purposes such as flood monitoring during rainy seasons where one needs real time data on water levels so that immediate action can be taken by authorities when flooding occurs resulting from excessive rainfall.

For instance in agriculture, remote sensing data can be used to identify regions with poor agricultural productivity; which may be due to erosion or unsuitability for crop growth.

For instance, remote sensing data can be used to identify regions with poor agricultural productivity; which may be due to erosion or unsuitability for crop growth. This information can be used by farmers and policy makers alike to determine where new irrigation schemes should be established and the type of crops that should be grown in a particular region.

Remotely sensed data can also be applied at a higher level like the national scale. For example, it can help identify areas that are prone to flooding or drought caused by climate change such as El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). These results can then guide national initiatives aimed at mitigating these effects through increased adaptation strategies such as introducing drought tolerant crops into areas prone to drought conditions.

In terms of environment monitoring and management, accurate land use maps are crucial to determining the general state and capacity of a region’s ecosystem.

The process of collecting data to build land use maps can be a very useful method for determining the general state and capacity of a region’s ecosystem. Land use maps are important tools for environmental monitoring and management, because they provide information about what is happening in one place at a specific time. This information can help determine things like which areas have been modified by human activity, how much space has been set aside for agriculture or forestry, and where there may be significant risks to public health.

Having accurate maps also aids in making decisions about new developments such as building roads or creating protected areas like national parks.

Orbital and Aerial imaging

There are two main types of remote sensing: orbital and aerial. Orbital remote sensing uses satellites in space, whereas aerial remote sensing uses airplanes in the air. Both methods gather data that is then processed through image interpretation software to create a map.

The main difference between the two types of remote sensing is their scale and resolution. Satellites can collect data from large areas at lower resolutions (e.g., 1×1 km). Planes, on the other hand, can collect detailed information at higher resolutions (e.g., 1×1 m).

The United States Geological Survey has been collecting digital images over Zimbabwe since 1972 to 2013. As such we have satellite imagery dating back 40 years ago until current.

The United States Geological Survey has been collecting digital images over Zimbabwe since 1972 to 2013. As such we have satellite imagery dating back 40 years ago until current. Satellite imagery is useful for monitoring large areas on earth quickly, especially in remote locations where no other way of monitoring would be possible. It can also be used to monitor areas that are hard to access or dangerous because of war or political instability. These images will help researchers to understand changes in land use and land cover over time and space which is important for conservation efforts as well as climate change studies.

With sensors aboard satellites and planes we can monitor large areas on earth quickly

Remote sensing is a method of collecting information about land, sea and air objects from a distance. With sensors aboard satellites and planes we can monitor large areas on earth quickly. Satellites are also called remote sensing platforms because they orbit earth at an altitude of about 400km (250 miles). They have a long lifespan and can be used for many years to collect data from all over the planet. A satellite takes images or collects other types of data using its sensors (think cameras) which are mounted on its body or under its wings. The information collected by these instruments is transmitted back to earth where it is processed into useful information by computers at ground stations around the globe.

Conclusion

The above information provides a brief introduction to what remote sensing is and its applications in Zimbabwe.

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